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Council approves road contract

Work is set to begin on two areas of Farmington after action taken by the Farmington City Council during the May 22 meeting.

“We awarded a contract … to Jokerst for approximately $104,000 for replacement of a box culvert on Liberty Street in the vicinity of Parkland Health Center,” Farmington City Greg Beavers said. “It needs to be extended so we can construct a sidewalk through there and the existing pipes … was a corrugated metal pipe that is currently being used is beginning to show failure.”

Farmington Public Works Director Larry Lacy told the council the engineer’s estimate for the work was about $150,000.

“We believe we are getting a very good value from Jokerst, Inc. They are a local, known contractor with a good reputation,” he said.

Lacy said work is expected to begin sometime before school starts in August and will last approximately two weeks.

The portion of that project will cost approximately $55,000.

In addition, the street will be paved and sidewalk improvements in the area will be performed as well. The city will coordinate with Parkland Health Center before the project begins regarding traffic flow.

In addition, Beavers said, the city will extend the box culvert on Maple Valley Drive.

“Everyone will know where this is,” he said. “There is a place on Maple Valley Drive where the sidewalk kicks out into the street. It was a compromised decision we had to make a few years ago when we were building that sidewalk.”

The reason the decision was made at that time for the sidewalk to be in that particular configuration is due to the location of a gas main and fiber optics in the area – plus the cost for a box culvert at that location would cost about $44,000.

The cost of the project will be $44,001 and is part of the contract with Jokerst, Inc.

“That’s why we just kind of worked around it,” he said. “But, it has been one of the most commented things in town for a couple of years now, so we’ve decided to go ahead and spend the money and widen that road back out to its original configuration.”

In other discussion, Ward II Councilman Dale Wright asked Lacy about areas experiencing stormwater problems during periods of high rain.

One of those mentioned was the area around Smith Street on the southeast portion of the city.

“We are in the process of working on a project over there,” Lacy said. “We will need to do some detention either before or at the same time as that project because it would shorten the time of concentration and increase the peak flow that comes out of there.

“We are currently acquiring properties for a detention basin on Washington Street and will probably need an additional one at Fleming and Walter (Streets) to accommodate the flow … that’s going to be a challenging project.

Lacy explained the work on Louise Street in that area was performed first because it was more contained and controlled than the other areas in that subdivision.

“These things take time,” Lacy said of the work to improve stormwater problems. “The storm we had (at the beginning of May) does indeed count as a 100-year storm” – to define a rainfall event that statistically has a 1 percent chance of occurring in any given year.

On top of the inundation of storm water during these storms is the surcharge to the sewer system when the storms occur.

Beavers explained during the meeting there are areas where it isn’t containing the storm water, especially in a channel-to-channel ditch.

“It can overflow and actually flood the sanitary sewer,” he said. “I don’t think that happens real frequently.”

The city has budgeted about $4 million in sewer work during this fiscal year.

“You don’t fix stormwater or sanitary sewer problems as an event,” he said. “It is a lifetime process – a constant investment.”

Beavers said the life cycle of a sewer main and a manhole is about 40 years – with 100 miles of sewer main and 1,800 manholes in the city’s system.

“We’ve got a pretty good program lined up for the next eight years (in the repair) and you should start seeing some improvement on that,” he said.

Lacy said the city is looking at the elevation of new home construction more than in the past.

“The elevation of homes wasn’t really looked at and now we’re taking a really close look at elevation of homes, so people aren’t building directly adjacent to the channel … with an elevation that is at or even below the channel,” Lacy told the council. “We’re trying to help eventual homeowners be protected in that manner.”

Mayor Larry Forsythe also announced during the meeting city employees will begin wearing ID cards to identify themselves as such.

“Whenever a city employee is in your yard working and you don’t know who he is, he will present his card to you and you will know he is a city worker,” he said.

A section of Maple Valley Drive drawing feedback from the residents of Farmington will be under construction soon. The Farmington City Council approved a contract with Jokerst, Inc. during the May 22 meeting for $104,000 in culvert work. Among the two projects is the replacement of the culvert at this location - and moving the roadway back to the original width in this area.

A section of Maple Valley Drive drawing feedback from the residents of Farmington will be under construction soon. The Farmington City Council approved a contract with Jokerst, Inc. during the May 22 meeting for $104,000 in culvert work. Among the two projects is the replacement of the culvert at this location – and moving the roadway back to the original width in this area.

Shawnna Robinson is the managing editor of the Farmington Press and can be reached at 573-518-3628 or srobinson@farmingtonpressonline.com

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