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Preliminary plans for new development presented

Most of the talk during the Farmington City Council hearings and regular session Thursday was of the growing residential areas in the community.

Three public hearings were held pertaining to the future “Pine Trails Subdivision” – an area of more than 100 acres.

Developers Joe and Chuck Koppeis said the new development – which they hope to begin construction on this fall – will be a nice addition to the community, complete with walking trails and community green space.

“[Pine Trails] will be a nice subdivision with walking trails, park areas,” Chuck said. “We just think it’s going to be a nice asset.”

The development – which is divided into five phases – will feature 160 single-family lots, along with 40 to 60 villas and an apartment complex with approximately 200 units.

Joe said adjustments to the villa complex will be made based on the market need.

“We are going to have some nice walking trails, green space, a lake,” Joe added. “There are over two miles of walking trails.

“It should be a really nice, well-planned, complete development. We hope to be under construction by fall.”

Three of the public hearings dealt with the development. The first hearing was for the preliminary plat for the subdivision located off Pine Street on 170 acres formerly owned by the Presbyterian Children’s Home.

The property was purchased by the men in October of last year.

Tim Porter, director of development services for the city, explained the first hearing is the first step in the process of developing the property.

Porter told the council the planning and zoning commission gave a favorable rating for the request.

There will be a rerouting of Pine Street through the new development, connecting with Industrial Drive and Timberline Drive – lending to another route to that part of town which may, in the future, lessen congestion on other east-west routes.

Porter made mention the developers are considering selling off a portion of the property in the future – something Joe touched on after the meeting – mentioning discussions to possibly sell a portion of the land to the Farmington School District for a future school site.

Not included in the preliminary plot presented to the council was plans for water retention basins.

“That is something that will be included in the next part of their presentations before planning and zoning,” Porter said.

He noted the stormwater improvement plan for this development is scheduled to be reviewed by Dr. Charles Patterson, a professor at Missouri S&T specializing in civil, architectural and environmental engineering.

Julie Umfleet, a resident in the area near the future development site, expressed concern over what effect the new subdivision would have on stormwater runoff. Umfleet said she and her neighbors live near a water retention area. She notes they have not had problems with water in their homes.

However, she worries the additional development could cause future issues – noting water pools in the area following heavy rains.

Addressing her concerns at the meeting was Rick Rohlfing with BFA Engineering. Rohlfing is a site engineer for the project.

“We are going to improve the stormwater drainage issue,” he said. “We realize it is stormwater coming onto [the property] and it is behoove of us to handle that so that it doesn’t impact what we are trying to produce here on our site.”

Rohlfing said his company is proposing a stormwater drainage easement to accommodate the overflow coming onto the property.

“We shouldn’t be impacting or damming up or blocking any more stormwater onto any of those [current] properties,” he said.

In fact, another of the public hearings before the council included an application for vacation of a 20-foot wide storm easement.

“In concept, we’re allocating easements, we’re allocating areas on the plat … for stormwater detention with intricate designs … that will be submitted for review approval,” he said. “We’re not to that stage yet. Those designs will happen next phase.”

Farmington Mayor Larry Forsythe commented to the council he has known the Koppeis family “all my life, so if they tell you they are going to do something, they are going to do it right … you might as well take it to the bank that they are going to do it right.”

Ward II Councilman John Crouch, who heads up the Public Works committee, expressed his thanks for the work going into the infrastructure of this project as well.

“We also appreciate you having a subdivision of this caliber and this quality developed right here in Farmington,” he said.

The second public hearing is for a rezoning of the property from the current R-1 Single Family to proposed zoning of R-3 Single Family and R-4 General Residential. The third public hearing is regarding vacation of the 60-foot Right-of-Way on Pine Street, 50 foot Right-of-Way on Stonegate Street, 20-foot wide storm easement and 15-foot utility easement conveyed on lots 3-11 of the Pine Trails Subdivision.

Two additional public hearings were also held. The first was for a rezoning of property at 545 Wallace Road to R-3 Single Family from the current OA-1 Office and Apartment, submitted by Mullins Custom Homes LLC on behalf of Vicky Winick.

The final public hearing was for the vacation of the utility easement at 1007 N. Washington St. and is submitted by the city of Farmington.

Each of these items was up for a first reading by title only during regular session.

Rick Rohlfing with BFA Engineering speaks to the Farmington City Council on Thursday, detailing work his firm is doing for the new Pine Trails Subdivision being developed for property off Pine Street in the eastern part of the city. Rohlfing said the firm is working to control the impact the development will have on the city's stormwater system. 

Rick Rohlfing with BFA Engineering speaks to the Farmington City Council on Thursday, detailing work his firm is doing for the new Pine Trails Subdivision being developed for property off Pine Street in the eastern part of the city. Rohlfing said the firm is working to control the impact the development will have on the city’s stormwater system. 

Shawnna Robinson is the managing editor of the Farmington Press and can be reached at 573-518-3628 or srobinson@farmingtonpressonline.com

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