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DAYS GONE BY

DAYS GONE BY

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30 Years – 1990

Rodney K. Rhodes, D.D.S.M.S., returned home to Farmington to establish an orthodontic practice. Rodney is married to the former Katie Chastain who also grew up in Farmington.

The Farmington Homecoming celebration that featured a parade, queen coronation, a football game, the River Rendezvous, and the Fifth Annual Fall Festival, was very well received. There was good attendance due to the good weather, however, Farmington lost their football game to Ste. Genevieve 21-7. Bobbi Henson, escorted by Eric Hill, was crowned Homecoming Queen.

The body of a 31-year-old Desloge resident was found off Highway 8 near Leadwood. The body was found approximately 22 feet from the highway on a trail leading to a boat dock on Big River. The young woman was identified as Constance S. Zaleski. The autopsy determined the cause of death was strangulation by rope.

40 Years – 1980

A 16-year-old was arrested in connection with a rash of vandalism leaving over $7,000 in damages. The youth was apprehended as one of the vandalism victims saw a car fitting the description of the youth’s car. City police also saw the suspect in the vicinity. They were also looking for another individual that was noted to be also involved in the vandalism of 32 cars, three businesses, and one church.

The retail promotions committee of the Farmington Chamber of Commerce planned a downtown promotion for the evening of Oct. 30. The theme of the nighttime sale was “Spooktacular Savings” and centered on Halloween the following day. There would be free roller skating for youth while their parents would be able to shop.

Farmington named its senior volleyball players at their last home game. They were Lori Mell, Sonya Nicholson, Lisa Rariden, Teresa Thomas, Donna Johnson, and Mary Burcham.

Farmington firemen visited the elementary schools to talk to the students about fire prevention during Fire Prevention Week. This comes after firefighters were called to a fire near some huge propane tanks. If the tanks had blown, people living within a six-mile radius would have had to be evacuated and countless people could have been hurt or perished. This got the fire department thinking about how the firefighters risk their lives every day. The Farmington fire department had 22 employees and many of those firefighters also attended classes in addition to their regular occupation and their work with the department.

50 Years – 1970

Plans were outlined for a more active and organized Farmington Chamber of Commerce beginning in 1971. Members were given the outlines for a more active and organized chamber. Vice-President Dean Danieley made the announcement to the general membership on a decision made by the chamber’s board of directors. Harry Sailor, a former executive at Trimfoot Company and former member of the Farmington City Council, was to assume the position as Farmington’s first full-time executive secretary. Arrangements were underway to obtain an office space in downtown Farmington and to develop it into a chamber headquarters and a special “Economic-Industrial Planning Station.”

Farmington High School began a new program called “Cooperative Occupational Education,” or COE, that was a training program between the school, the employer, and the student. The class was taught by Floyd Hager. The students were in class from 1-2 p.m. and then released from school at 2 to go to their workstations. The students received two hours of credit — one for COE class and one for their supervised work. The employer outlined a training plan in cooperation with the school. Mr. Hager would visit the students on-the-job and work with the employer to provide the best training coordinated with the students.

Several Farmington High School students attended the 16th Annual Fall Editor-Adviser Workshop of the Southern Illinois School Press Association held on the Carbondale campus. Those attending were Nancy Dunlap, Dan Stott, Teri Hulsey, Debbie Thomas, Tracy Bowden, Debbie Starnes, Buena Brown, Phyllis Elders, Sandra Ritter, and Mimi Landrum.

60 Years – 1960

In a special city election, Farmington citizens voted overwhelmingly to approve a proposal to extend the city limits on the east, south and west fringes of the community.

Attractions at the IGA Fall Harvest and Cooking School were prizes, an outstanding and lively local talent show and a special display at the Flat River Field House of “Henney Kilowatt,” an all-electric automobile.

The Farmington High School Band and Student Council sponsored the school’s first Football Homecoming in connection with the Flat River-Farmington football game. Events were a parade, with king and queen candidates from classes of the Farmington Senior High School.

A Twin Navion plane piloted by Victor Runquist of St. Joseph, Missouri, was forced down on the Arthur Stark dairy farm, south of Arcadia, after running low on gas and encountering bad weather. The pilot was not injured.

Paving stakes were set along the 4-mile stretch of new Highway 67 between Leadington and Farmington.

H.L. Wichman and other personnel at the Wichman Motor Company on East Columbia showed off their new building. The front of the building, as well as the interior, was improved with light-colored brick laid in the attractive “stacked” style, with colorful glazed finish material above the display windows.

Twins of the week were Nan and Jan Schwint, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Schwint of Farmington.

70 Years – 1950

An application was filed with the Missouri Public Service Commission in Jefferson City to merge the Southeast Missouri Telephone Company with the Southwestern Bell Telephone Company, with no effective date specified. The Bell Company owned all of the southeast Missouri utility’s common stock.

Mrs. John Hibbitts, Farmington extension club worker exhibited the completed United Nations flag. It was the first one completed in this county under the director of the county extension office and Miss Clara Underwood, home agent.

The population of St. Francois County took a sudden jump due to the birth of two sets of twins. State Trooper and Mrs. George Rouse; and Acting Coroner and Mrs. Paul K. Dugal, became the parents of sets of twin boys. The Rouse twins — David Paul, 4 lbs. 13 oz. and Donald Franklin 5 lbs. 14 oz. — were the first to arrive. Then came James Ray Dugal 5 lbs. 5 ¾ oz., and Gerald Lee Dugal 5 lbs. 14 oz.

The National Guard held an open house at the new armory of the local unit of the National Guard on South Washington Street. A display of all equipment and weapons, including some of the newest used by the unit, was maintained all day. Personnel were on hand to conduct the public through the armory and answer questions.

The Farmington Post Office was rated 100 percent by postal inspectors for the first time in the history of the office, according to Postmaster Elmer W. Brown.

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