Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
This week's bestsellers from Publishers Weekly
AP

This week's bestsellers from Publishers Weekly

  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}
"The Hill We Climb," by Amanda Gorman.

"The Hill We Climb," by Amanda Gorman. (Penguin Random House/TNS)

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, April 3, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group.

(Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.)

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. "The Red Book" by James Patterson and David Ellis (Little, Brown) Last week: —

2. "The Four Winds" by Kristin Hannah (St. Martin’s) Last week: 1

3. "The Midnight Library" by Matt Haig (Viking) Last week: 3

4. "Win" by Harlan Coben (Grand Central) Last week: 2

5. "Eternal" by Lisa Scottoline (Putnam) Last week: 5

6. "Klara and the Sun" by Kazuo Ishiguro (Knopf) Last week: 8

7. "The Invisible Life of Addie Larue" by V.E. Schwab (Tor) Last week: 9

8. "Life After Death" by Sister Souljah (Atria) Last week: 4

9. "Sunflower Sisters: A Novel" by Martha Hall Kelly (Ballantine) Last week: —

10. "The Affair" by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) Last week: 14

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. "The Hill We Climb: An Inaugural Poem for the Country" by Amanda Gorman (Viking) Last week: —

2. "The Women of the Bible Speak: The Wisdom of 16 Women and Their Lessons for Today" by Shannon Bream (Broadside) Last week: —

3. "Seeing Beautiful Again: 50 Devotions to Find Redemption in Every Part of Your Story" by Lysa Terkeurst (Thomas Nelson) Last week: —

4. "Get Good with Money: Ten Simple Steps to Becoming Financially Whole" by Tiffany Aliche (Rodale) Last week: —

5. "Violence. Speed. Momentum." by Dr. Disrespect (Gallery) Last week: —

6. "The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race" by Walter Isaacson (Simon & Schuster) Last week: 4

7. "How to Do the Work: Recognize Your Patterns, Heal from Your Past, and Create Your Self" by Nicole LePera (Harper Wave) Last week: 2

8. "Everybody Fights: So Why Not Get Better at It?" by Kim Holderness and Penn Holderness (W) Last week: —

9. "Eat Better, Feel Better: My Recipes for Wellness and Healing, Inside and Out" by Giada De Laurentiis (Rodale) Last week: 1

10. "Everything Will Be Okay: Life Lessons for Young Women (from a Former Young Woman)" by Dana Perino (Twelve) Last week: 8

___

0
0
0
0
0

Stay up-to-date on what's happening

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

When Carribean Fragoza was a child, she ate dirt. "Like I ate dirt a lot," she said in a recent video interview. And her tías in Guadalajara, Mexico, really liked eating clay pots. They'd break off little pieces and hand them to her "like they were chocolate." During one of her first prenatal appointments decades later, the obstetrician, concerned about lead in her body, asked Fragoza if she ...

Richard Thompson’s combination of skills as a songwriter and guitarist is unmatched. The musician’s career — from his rise with British folk-rock inventors Fairport Convention to his 1970s partnership with his wife Linda Thompson to three decades as a solo artist — stretches over 50 years. But Thompson’s new memoir, which was written with Scott Timberg, zeroes in on only the first eight. It’s ...

"Who Is Maud Dixon?" by Alexandra Andrews; Little, Brown (336 pages, $28) ——— The title of this smart, slyly clever debut from journalist Alexandra Andrews says it all. Just who is this Maud Dixon whose first novel is the most talked about book in the history of publishing? Discussions about the book are rivaled by the secret identity of Maud. All that is known about the author is that Maud ...

"Infinite Country" by Patricia Engel; Avid Reader Press/Simon & Schuster (208 pages, $25) ——— "Infinite Country," the new novel by Patricia Engel, has an irresistible first line: “It was her idea to tie up the nun.” The girl who has the idea, 15-year-old Talia, is intent on escaping from a remote reform school in the mountains of Colombia. "Infinite Country" is all about making escapes from ...

At least two powerful figures will be voting Amanda Gorman for president as soon as the 23-year-old inauguration poet is eligible in 2036. In a new Vogue interview with writer Doreen St. Felix, Gorman elaborated on her plan to campaign for the highest office in the United States — and revealed that she has already secured unofficial but key endorsements from former Secretary of State (and ...

Ernest Hemingway's terse prose style might seem clichéd today, but his short, declarative sentences and beneath-the-surface meaning were groundbreaking in his time. Here are four novels and a short-story collection that are essential reading. 'The Sun Also Rises' (1926) His first novel is the love story of Jake Barnes, who suffered a tragic war wound, and the promiscuous Lady Brett Ashley, who ...

It was a moment of high drama in the brief life of the Affordable Care Act, the signal achievement of President Obama's two terms. Shortly after midnight on July 28, 2017, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) strode to the Senate floor and placed himself before the clerk's podium to cast his vote on a Republican measure to repeal the law. The GOP-controlled House already had voted its assent, and the ...

Many of us approach topics like race and racism with apprehension, discomfort and sometimes anger. For Ibram X. Kendi, founder and director of the Boston University Center for Antiracist Research, researching, writing and talking about these difficult topics are all in a day's work. Author of bestsellers like "Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America," ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News