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2 new COVID-19-related deaths in Madison County
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2 new COVID-19-related deaths in Madison County

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Health Center prepares for coronavirus

The Madison County Health Department reported two more COVID-19-related deaths on Thursday.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and caregivers," their update said.

This brings the COVID-related deaths to six in Madison County.

They also reported nine new confirmed cases on Thursday. There are now 40 active and 506 total cases in the county.

The health department also reported the following COVID-19 exposure: Calvary Church, Oct. 18, 11 a.m. service, 6 p.m. celebrate recovery meeting, church bus #9 evening van for services, monitor for symptoms through Nov. 1.

Presbyterian Manor update

Daily cases of COVID-19 continue to climb in St. Francois County and Farmington Presbyterian Manor received new testing results from mass testing occurring on Monday, according to a release from the facility on Thursday.

They said the results included positive results for two non-direct care employees and a direct care employee.

All residents tested negative as a result of Monday’s testing.

A third employee, who provides direct resident care, tested positive with a rapid point-of-care test on Wednesday. Aside from the three positives, all other employees tested negative.

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Contact tracing confirmed no additional exposure to the positive employees.

The St. Francois County Health Center has been notified and recommends continuing with the current testing strategy. Residents and employees will be tested again next Monday.

CMS requires surveillance testing of all employees, agency employees, volunteers, hospice, lab and therapy providers at our campus on a frequency determined by the county’s COVID-19 testing positivity rate. Based on the county positivity rate of between 5 and 10 percent for COVID-19 tests, their campus has been testing employees once a week.

The employees will recuperate at home. They plan to follow CDC guidelines in determining when an employee may return to work.  Under the current guidelines, employees may return to work when at least 24 hours have passed since resolution of the employee’s fever without the use of fever-reducing medications, and the employee’s symptoms have improved and at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared. Asymptomatic positive employees will quarantine for 14 days.

Farmington Presbyterian Manor continues to screen all employees as they enter the community building for a shift and before they have any direct contact with residents.  In addition, staff members are wearing masks per CDC recommendations. 

Iron County Historical Society update

Due to the increasing number of COVID-19 cases in Iron County and the region, the Iron County Historical Society will once again be closing their museum located in the Whistle Junction Visitor Center in Arcadia, according to a Facebook update on Thursday.

“Our volunteers are all of an age to be vulnerable to the adverse effects of this virus and we have to put their health considerations before anything else,” the update said.

They will remain open on Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. through Oct. 31.

“You will still be able to reach us via this Facebook page or via email at ironcohissoc@hotmail.com and we sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this closure may cause,” the updated said. “We will reopen as soon as we possibly can.”

This closure does not impact the opening of the station for Amtrak passengers.

Nikki Overfelt is a reporter for the Daily Journal. She can be reached at noverfelt@dailyjournalonline.com.

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