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Author Yiyun Li has received one of the top honors for short story writers, the PEN/Malamud Award for “exceptional achievement. Li, 49, has published the collections “Gold Boy” and “A Thousand Years of Good Prayers,” along with five novels and two nonfiction books. She has received numerous other awards, and teaches creative writing at Princeton University. Two of her short stories, “The Princess of Nebraska” and the title work from “A Thousand Years of Good Prayers,” were adapted into films by Wayne Wang. The Malamud award has previously been given to Alice Munro, Saul Bellow and George Saunders among others. 

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Robert Jones Jr.‘s historical novel “The Prophets” and Anthony Veasna So’s posthumous debut story collection “Afterparties” are among the winners of the 34th annual Triangle Awards, given for outstanding LGBTQ literature. So, who died suddenly in 2020 at age 28, became the first posthumous winner of the honor for best LGBTQ fiction. Jones’ novel, which imagines a love affair between two enslaved Black men, was named the outstanding debut fiction book. Other winners include Ari Banias’ “A Symmetry” for best trans and gender-variant literature, Cheryl Boyce Taylor’s “Mama Phife Represents” for best lesbian poetry and John Keene’s “Punks” for best gay poetry.

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English actor Daisy Edgar-Jones stars this summer in the big screen adaptation of “Where the Crawdads Sing." Delia Owens debut novel became an unlikely phenomenon thanks at least in part to Reese Witherspoon, who selected it for her book club in 2018 and, with longtime film executive Elizabeth Gabler, acquired the rights to produce a feature film. Edgar-Jones plays the part of Kya, a girl who grows up largely alone in the marshes of North Carolina. She said director Olivia Newman has "imbued the story with a lyricism and a fairy tale quality that’s so beautiful.” The film opens in theaters nationwide on July 15.

An author’s online essay on why she used plagiarized material in a novel pulled earlier this year has itself been removed after editors found she had again lifted material. Jumi Bello’s  “I Plagiarized Parts of My Debut Novel. Here’s Why” appeared just briefly Monday on the website lithub.com. Bello’s debut novel, “The Leaving,” had been scheduled to come out in July. Riverhead Books canceled it in February. Lit Hub editor Jonny Diamond said Monday that the plagiarized material concerned passages about the history of plagiarism; several commentators on social media had found similarities between Bello’s writing and work from other sources.

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A private university in Mississippi has awarded the third Angie Thomas Writers Scholarship. It is named for the author of “The Hate U Give” and other bestselling young adult novels. Incoming freshman Dee Holden will receive four years of tuition, room and board at Thomas’ alma mater, Belhaven University in Jackson. Holden is a U.S. citizen living in Yantai, China. She submitted creative writing samples to apply for the scholarship. The university says Thomas took part in an online meeting April 25 to tell Holden about the award. Belhaven established the scholarship to honor Thomas, a 2011 graduate.

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Best-selling author Dave Eggers is offering high school seniors in South Dakota’s second-largest city free copies of his book “The Circle” and copies of four books by other authors that were removed from the district’s schools. School administrators in Rapid City deemed the books inappropriate for high school students and and marked the district’s copies as surplus to be destroyed. Eggers said, “The mass destruction of books by school boards is an unconscionable horror, and the freethinking young people of South Dakota shouldn’t be subjected to it." Eggers said Rapid City seniors can receive any of the books that were pulled from the high school at no cost to them by emailing collaborator of his.

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Janelle Monáe has brought a bit of the future to the Met Gala, donning a glittering Ralph Lauren look. The Grammy-nominated singer left their hats at home for a sparkling headpiece attached to a black and white figure-hugging gown. They playfully tell The Associated Press that the look is “gilded glamour from the future. Monáe, who recently said they are nonbinary, has been focusing heavily on sci-fi recently, releasing a book called the “Memory Librarian” that elaborates on the Afrofuturistic album “Dirty Computer.” Monáe is one of hundreds of invitees at Monday's Met Gala, which raises money for the Metropolitan Museum's Costume Institute.

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Nobel laureate Louise Glück is still breaking new ground at age 79. The celebrated poet has completed her first prose narrative. “Marigold and Rose: A Fiction” runs 64 pages, unfolding like a fable as Glück imagines the thoughts of infant twins. “Marigold and Rose” originates in a very contemporary way. Videos of Glück's granddaughters Emmy and Lizzy were sent to her online by her son from California during a time she was unable to visit because of the pandemic. She told The Associated Press in a recent phone interview that watching the videos became an obsession to her.

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TV shows about sci-fi or comic book fare usually inspire fan conventions — not a sitcom about four women of a certain age living together in Florida. But more than 2,000 “The Golden Girls” fans are converging this weekend for Golden-Con in Chicago. The three-day event, which started Friday, giving people a chance to mingle, watch panels and buy merch revolving around the NBC sitcom.  The show, which ran from 1985-1992, starred Bea Arthur, Rue McClanahan, Estelle Getty and Betty White — who died at age 99 in December. It was revered for showing their characters deal with issues later in life like ageism, sex and LGBTQ rights.

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Romeo Rolando Hinojosa-Smith, an award-winning Texas author who began in the 1970s writing a series of novels that told the stories of people living in a fictional county along the Texas-Mexico border, has died. He was 93. Hinojosa-Smith was an English professor at the University of Texas at Austin for over 30 years. His daughter, Clarissa Hinojosa, said he died Tuesday at an assisted living facility for dementia patients near Austin. Hinojosa-Smith, who wrote in both English and Spanish, is known for his “Klail City Death Trip” series, which chronicles the changes that have taken place in South Texas over the years.

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Crime fiction writer extraordinaire Laura Lippman’s latest is “Seasonal Work: Stories,” a collection of short stories and one novella about fierce women (including an appearance by Tess Monaghan) dealing with betrayal, secrets, heartbreak and murder.

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Fiction this fall will also include works from Jonathan Franzen, Sally Rooney, Lauren Groff, Colm Toibin and Strout, and from four of the past six winners of the fiction Pulitzer Prize: Erdrich, Richard Powers, Colson Whitehead and Anthony Doerr. "Silverview" is a posthumous release from John le Carre, who died last year. Gayl Jones' "Palmares" is her first novel in more than 20 years, and Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka's "Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth" is the Nigerian playwright's first novel in nearly 50 years.

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Near the end of 2020, the pandemic had lasted long enough for author Jodi Picoult to try something that seemed unthinkable for novelists in its early stages — turn it into fiction.

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Stephen Graham Jones, whose work runs the gamut of horror, science fiction, crime fiction and experimental novels, here crafts “a thought-provoking trip to the edge of your seat in this rural creature feature,” wrote Kirkus Reviews in a starred review.

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This book’s premise is irresistible: Mild-mannered bookseller Malcolm has published on his blog a list of fiction’s eight most perfect murders — ranging from Agatha Christie to Donna Tartt — only to find himself eyed with suspicion when a local serial killer seems to be making his way through the list.

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The seven essays in this book, subtitled “In Which Four Russians Give a Master Class on Writing, Reading and Life,” are derived from the Russian literature class that George Saunders has taught for decades at Syracuse University, examining how fiction works and why it matters. Penguin Random House, Jan. 12

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