Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Wastewater

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has increased the Port of Morrow’s groundwater contamination fine to $2.1 million following additional wastewater violations. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports the agency added $800,000 to the Port’s original $1.3 million fine Friday for over-applying nitrogen-rich wastewater on agricultural fields in the Lower Umatilla Basin. The area is burdened with groundwater pollution and is the primary drinking water source for Morrow and Umatilla counties. A DEQ spokesperson says the agency knew about additional violations but needed further documentation. The Port's executive director says the company recognizes groundwater contamination has been a serious problem but says it’s also a community problem that will require a community solution.

  • Updated

New Mexico and the U.S. government have reached a $32 million settlement to address claims stemming from a 2015 mine spill that polluted rivers in three western states. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and other state officials announced the agreement Thursday. The spill released 3 million gallons of wastewater from the inactive Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado. The bright-yellow plume of arsenic, lead and other heavy metals flowed south to New Mexico, the Navajo Nation and Utah. Water utilities were forced to shut down intake valves and farmers stopped drawing from the rivers as the plume moved downstream. Colorado and the tribe also have reached multimillion-dollar settlements.

  • Updated

Officials in Oregon's Morrow County along the Columbia River have declared a local state of emergency after private well testing showed high levels of nitrate contamination. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports during a Thursday special meeting, Morrow County commissioners voted 3-0 in favor of the measure, which will allow the county to take immediate action to protect drinking water. The county is distributing bottled water and will set up water distribution trailers in the small city of Boardman. Earlier this year, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality fined the Port of Morrow $1.3 million for overapplying tons of nitrogen-rich wastewater onto agricultural fields. The Port says it's looking at pollution reduction measures.

  • Updated

Pennsylvania's Republican-controlled state Senate is backing legislation criticized by opponents as a vehicle for-profit water companies to take over municipal water authorities by imposing expensive regulations on them. Opponents also warned that the bill will precipitate ratepayer increases when water authorities must meet the new regulations or after they are forced to sell out to for-profit water companies. The bill passed Tuesday, 27-23, with the backing of Senate Republican leadership. Opposition crossed party lines. The sponsor, Sen. Pat Stefano, R-Fayette, said the bill will create “uniform safety, security and quality standards for all water and wastewater suppliers.” The bill goes to the House.

  • Updated

At least 15 people who attended a public affairs conference last week on Michigan’s Mackinac Island have tested positive for COVID-19. They include U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. The gathering is put on each year by a business group, the Detroit Regional Chamber, and attracts more than 1,000 public officials, journalists and others. Participants were required to show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination or a negative test. Buttigieg disclosed his infection on Twitter, saying he had mild symptoms. Mackinac Island’s wastewater tested “fairly high” for evidence of COVID-19 just before Memorial Day. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer so far has tested negative.

  • Updated

The sight of fountains, swimming pools, gardens and golf courses in Western cities like Phoenix, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, San Diego and Albuquerque can seem jarring as drought and climate change tightening their grip on the region. But Western water experts say they aren’t necessarily cause for concern. Many Western cities over the past three decades have diversified their water sources, boosted local supplies, and use water more efficiently now than in the past. A look at how Western cities have prepared for a future with less water.

  • Updated

The Bismarck Board of Aldermen approved a contractor's bid for wastewater improvements on a piece of land along Highway 32 to enhance future c…

  • Updated

EPA, facing a 31.4 percent cut, or $2.6 billion. The plan would cut 3,200 jobs at the agency, eliminate a new plan for tighter regulations on power plants, and "zero out" programs to clean up the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay. EPA climate change research would be eliminated. Grants for state and local drinking and wastewater projects would be preserved.

  • Updated

Bismarck Mayor Seth Radford addressed the formation of a capital improvement advisory committee on city water and wastewater needs when the bo…

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News